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  • 12/13/2019 8:19 AM | Anonymous


    Cadillac President Steve Carlisle outlines GM's plans for the luxury brand to be mostly, if not entirely, electric vehicles by 2030. (Photo: Jamie L. LaReau/Detroit Free Press)

    SOURCE: Jamie L. LaReau/Detroit Free Press)

    General Motors luxury brand Cadillac's entire lineup could be electric by 2030.

    That means production of its internal combustion cars and SUVs could move from the plants where GM currently builds them.

    All of this will happen in a slow transition with some overlap as internal combustion engines (ICE) are phased out and electric vehicles (EVs) are introduced,  Steve Carlisle, Cadillac president, said Thursday.

    "None of us knows how long this transition will take. We will be there with internal combustion engines as well as electric" for a period, said Carlisle.  "But the majority, if not all, Cadillacs will be electric by 2030."

    Carlisle dubbed it the "end of the ICE age for Cadillac."

    New names, same cars

    Cadillac's popular models, such as the Escalade, will likely continue, but the full-size SUV will be propelled by an electric engine.

    "We have no intention of exiting that segment," Carlisle said of the Escalade.

    But Cadillac's electric vehicles will get new names. Gone will be numbers like the current monikers, replaced by words.

    Carlisle made the announcement at a media event in Detroit.

    He said that there is still upside sales potential for internal-combustion engine vehicles.

    Through the third quarter, Cadillac's total global sales are up 8.8%; in China total sales are up 10.9%. 

    "We feel like we're headed to a second sales record this year globally," Carlisle said.

    In the U.S., sales sputtered because of the 40-day nationwide UAW strike, which  disrupted production. The strike started Sept. 16.

    U.S. year-to-date total sales are up just 2.4%. Still, Carlisle said the brand should finish the year with sales gains in the U.S., the first time in five years.

    Technology leadership

    The Escalade will finish the year leading the full-size SUV segment, said Carlisle.

    Cadillac has sold 4,351 of the new XT6 SUVs, which launched in August. Carlisle expects to sell 10,000 by year-end.

    Cadillac will reveal the next-generation Escalade in Los Angeles in February ahead of the Oscars. The new Escalade and all of Cadillac's future lineup, including the new CT5 and CT4 sedans, will have Super Cruise.

    Super Cruise is Cadillac's hands-free driving technology. Currently, Cadillac only offers Super Cruise on the CT6 sedan.

    But Cadillac is at its best when it is leading GM's brands in technology and innovation, said Carlisle. Most luxury customers are open to electric cars, Carlisle said. That's why GM said in January that Cadillac would be its electric vehicle brand.

     In January, Cadillac debuted the concept of an all-electric crossover that will be brought to market in 2022.

    It's unclear where GM will build it, but it could likely be at Detroit-Hamtramck where GM said it would invest $3 billion to build a new all-electric pickup that will go on sale in the fall of 2021. That pickup has not yet been assigned a brand or name, Carlisle said.

    "Our production footprint will migrate" as GM changes from internal combustion cars to electric, said Carlisle. He said GM will have discussions with the UAW on how factory work will change and which vehicles might move to other plants. But it is most likely that over the next decade some plants that build ICE vehicles will be retooled to build electric cars.

    "We're going to enter the decade as an internal combustion brand," said Carlisle. "But we'll exit the decade as a battery-electric brand."

  • 09/26/2018 5:39 PM | Anonymous


    Reprint from Detroit Metro Times - Devin Culham

    Nearly four years after the luxury car brand moved its headquarters from Detroit to the fashionable SoHo district in New York, representatives at General Motors have announced that Cadillac will make its move to Warren.

    The initial move to New York was made with the intention of creating greater autonomy for the Cadillac brand to operate. However, with thousands of Cadillac employees still based in Michigan, that wasn't so easy. According to the Wall Street Journal, the luxury brand still relied on decisions made by Michigan employees – everything from style designs, vehicle features, and even pricing.

    Steve Carlisle, a GM executive who took over the Cadillac brand in April, spoke about the decision to the Wall Street Journal, saying that decision in part comes down to a necessity to streamline. "We have a huge number of launches ahead of us," Carlisle says, “We’ve got to think about how we take inefficiencies out of the communication process between the Cadillac team and the GM partners.”

    This decision comes after the departure of Cadillac's former head, Johan de Nysschen. Mr. de Nysschen who formerly worked Volkswagen AG’s Audi of America was said to not have an aligned vision with Detroit-based GM executives, causing disputes. Under de Nysschen, Cadillac sales began to slump in the U.S., falling behind luxury car competitors like Audi and BMW.

    Cadillac's current New York headquarters house roughly 110 employees – mostly executives and marketing personnel. Carlisle says that the new headquarters will be based in a renovated space in Warren, near the GM technical facilities where thousands of Cadillac's engineering and vehicle design employees are already based.

  • 04/18/2018 11:58 AM | Anonymous


    Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen is leaving General Motors and will be replaced by the head of GM Canada, Steve Carlisle, the company said Wednesday. As head of the Cadillac business and a senior vice-president of the parent company, Carlisle will report to GM president Dan Ammann.

    The automaker also named Travis Hester as the new president of GM Canada. Hester is currently vice-president of GM’s global product programs.
    Carlisle has been at the head of GM Canada since November 2014.

    Carlisle led a resurgence of the GM Canada franchise, the company said. The automaker led retail auto sales in Canada last year, and Buick, GMC and Cadillac set sales records in the country that year.

    "We appreciate Johan's efforts over the last four years in setting a stronger foundation for Cadillac," said General Motors President Dan Ammann in a release. "Looking forward, the world is changing rapidly, and, beginning with the launch of the new XT4, it is paramount that we capitalize immediately on the opportunities that arise from this rate of change. This move will further accelerate our efforts in that regard."

    The move comes as Cadillac takes steps to improve its performance in the luxury segment. De Nysschen had overseen a number of efforts to turn the brand around after years of lost market share in the United States. It moved its headquarters to New York City and said it would completely revamp its lineup with 11 new vehicles through 2021.

    Cadillac has garnered praise for its luxury and high-performance sedans such as the CT6 and the CTS-V, but the brand has missed out on the shift in the market away from passenger cars and toward SUVs. Cadillac has recently attempted to address this shift with crossovers such as the mid-sized XT5 and the new smaller XT4 crossover, which debuted just before the New York Auto Show in March.

    Cadillac also recently appointed a new chief marketing officer, former McDonald's executive Deborah Wahl, in early March.

    De Nysschen had previously served in top roles at Infiniti and Audi of America before taking the helm at Cadillac.